Is It Always About the Money?

 

The labor market is more candidate-driven than ever before. Talented job seekers are more tech-savvy and have more access to various tools that help them compare and contrast competing offers. This, combined with different personal motivators, has shifted the influence power in the recruitment process from employer to employee. As a result, many talent acquisition leaders, hiring managers and recruiters are re-approaching how they win over top talent. And as the power shifts in favor of the job seeker, it begs one important question: Does winning the best talent always boil down to offering more money? Exploring which tactics HR teams are using to address current employment motivators highlights the critical debate of monetary versus non-monetary compensation.

Cash Compensation vs. Intrinsic Benefits

For many companies, deciding where to focus their compensation and benefit programs isn’t so cut and dried. A recent study from Glassdoor indicates that 43% of employees expect a pay raise, and 35% said they would leave a job if they didn’t receive one. On the other hand, the same study reports that 79% of employees would prefer new or additional benefits. Choosing between cash or intrinsic benefits largely boils down to specific business objectives, but some industry approaches highlight impactful strategies for engagement and retention, including tactics like:

Offering Unique Benefits & Non-Monetary Compensation

Offering unique benefits and employee perks on top of monetary compensation might help attract talent. Perks like paid sick days, childcare assistance, and gym membership options all ranked above a flat-out pay raise in the study mentioned above.

Being up front about perks and benefits is equally important to attracting top talent. In the Glassdoor study mentioned above, Rusty Rueff, career and workplace expert says: “Employers should be communicating clearly about non-traditional compensation. Recruiters should take note that touting the benefits and perks offered can help win talent of different demographics, industries and occupations.” Making non-monetary compensation a priority can help recruiters remain relevant and competitive in a job market where roughly 4 out of 5 candidates prefer more robust benefits packages.

Salary Transparency

Delivering transparent salary information can resonate with potential candidates more than higher pay. Another survey from Glassdoor, the Global Salary Expectations Survey, found that 69% of employed adults across Europe and North America wish they knew more about market rates for salary and compensation for their positions and skill sets. Proactively offering detailed total compensation statements projects honesty and transparency to job seekers. Recruiting staff that considers salary transparency a high priority may have better success in separating themselves from the competition.

Incentivizing Loyalty

The current labor market is fickle. A Gallup study shows that 51% of workers are looking to leave their current jobs. A proactive and transparent approach to retention strategies will help give candidates a sense of belonging and incentivize loyalty from the moment they receive an offer. In addition, setting up a career development plan for new hires shows employees the value they add to the organization, encouraging a nurturing and supportive approach to career growth that will incentivize potential candidates.

In such a candidate-driven market, enticing and retaining top talent remains highly competitive. Candidates with changing values and a major influence on the overall recruitment experience will continue to affect how companies think about overall culture and how they market themselves to job seekers. Offering a robust benefits package that includes both monetary and non-monetary compensation, having a transparent approach to salary expectations, and focusing on retention are strategies used by top talent acquisition professionals to stay competitive.

Learn more about the benefits of a proactive approach to total compensation statements with this article.